Weird. I finished the introductory chapter

884685Not sure how I’m supposed to feel about this.  Last night, under what felt like a complete lack of motivation, I finished the introductory chapter that defines the protagonist . . . which is really an antagonist if you want to be technical.

Why?  Because my character is a devil.  He has lived under the pretense and illusion of competence, ala Screwtape, but is in reality, as I describe him, a “straight up, undiluted, Mephistophelean nitwit.”

Now, to chapter two.  Somewhere between fishing the McCloud River and wandering the streets of the town, and eating a Bison Burger at Floyd’s, I’m going to do this.

This thing is going to happen.  Now, I just lay in paralyzed fear about the specter of having REWRITE giant swaths of the book to fix unforeseen errors.

I know they’re coming.  How do I know?

It’s called the “Home Depot Effect.”  In effect, I start a project, you know–like switch out a simple P-trap under the sink.

So I go to Home Depot and buy a new P-trap.  I remove the old one, and then discover that the adjoining pipe leading up to the drain is now compromised because of a cracked union.

Back to Home Depot I go.

Then, it tunes out that I now don’t have the appropriate set of channel-locks to reach the giant nut stabilizing the whole thing.

Back to Home Depot.

Anyway, I COULD reference this back to my point, but I actually think the point is now clear.

 

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9 Responses to Weird. I finished the introductory chapter

  1. Ann Ahrens says:

    So, THAT’S the secret to success: “fishing the McCloud River and wandering the streets of the town, and eating a Bison Burger at Floyd’s.” I shall put this on my list of strategies!

  2. macian1910 says:

    Mephistophelean nitwit–ha! Sounds like a fun character–good luck with writing. Will you post exerpts or are you waiting until you finish it?

  3. macian1910 says:

    Mephistophelean nitwit–ha! That sounds like a fun character–good luck with writing. Will you be posting exerpts or are you waiting until you finish it?

  4. Steve says:

    When working on old plumbing, this saying is applicable: Anything that can go wrong, will go wrong.

  5. Steve says:

    I used to work for an HVAC company that would bid jobs a bit higher with a percentage known as the “Murphy Factor.” This allowed for the inevitable problems that accompany any job from making the job a major money loser.

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